A Virus May Cause Hearing Loss in Children

Posted on January 27, 2011. Filed under: 1, hearing education, hearing educatoin, hearing health | Tags: , , , , |

Over the years there have been many studies done by the University of Alabama  as well as the Baylor College of Medicine finding a correlation between a virus, namely Cytomegalovirus (CMV) and hearing health in children.

The virus is part of the herpes family, although not as easily spreadable. It can be transmitted through contact with blood, saliva, urine, breast milk, cervical secretions or semen. According to an article written by the American Speech-Language–Hearing Association (ASHA), “Most healthy children and adults infected with CMV will have no symptoms or might develop only a mild mononucleosis-like illness.”

Although adults might not experience any symptoms, mothers can still transfer the virus to the baby as a fetus which may result in loss of hearing among other disabilities. The only way to know if your child might have hearing damage due to this virus is by doing a blood spot analysis. Another way of knowing is if the mother was infected with the virus, then  the newborn should be tested.

About 10%-15% of children infected with the virus suffer from hearing loss. According to ASHA, preventing infection with the virus can be done “through simple hygienic practices such as hand-washing.”

If you believe your child may suffer from hearing loss visit your local Miami Audiologist such as Dr. Joseph Duran for a consultation.

 

Advertisements

Make a Comment

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Liked it here?
Why not try sites on the blogroll...

%d bloggers like this: